Successful Startup and 3D Printing Tools

| July 19, 2014 | 4 Comments

Two weekends ago we got the bike running!  Here’s a little sumthin sumthin of what went down.

One of the many things I didn’t get when I purchased this bike was the original tool kit, which isn’t a big deal really, because from what I’ve heard most of the tools were crap anyway. But, it also contained a fluid level dipstick for the middle gear and final drive.

So, a buddy of mine at my day job recently starting using a 3D printer for prototyping parts, and informed me we could use for personal projects as well.  Hunting around the yamaha-triples.org forum I found a detailed schematic of one and my friend recreated it in SolidWorks.

cad_1

And then we ran it through the 3D printer –

cad_2

cad_3

All measurements turned out to spec except for the minimum level for the final drive. That was off about .030″ .  I don’t know how oils will affect the plastic, but it should only come into contact with them briefly.

Filed in: My Projects
×

4 Comments on "Successful Startup and 3D Printing Tools"

Trackback | Comments RSS Feed

  1. Did it print a plastic part? FDM? We have 2 FDM machines at work and can have parts the next day.

    I’ve used SW from 99-2006, and ProE ever since. I prefer SW.

    Keep up the good work. I want to see some test ride vids!

    • ucr says:

      Hey Mat,

      A plastic part was created. I can’t find the MSDS for the filament material; the only reference is that it’s PLA. Thanks for the kind words, I’ll definitely have some test ride vids!

  2. Mat Harris says:

    I have the same M2 printer. PLA is great for rigid parts that won’t come into contact with liquids or heat. Because it is a biodegradable plastic, it tends to break down when it gets wet. I use PLA sutures and implants in surgery, which dissolve in the body after 3-6 months (medical grade PLA). I only say all this to indicate you may want to print a few if you plan to use them multiple times so you can compare a control piece to the one you are using which is exposed to oil or gas. It may change shape.

    • ucr says:

      Hey Mat,

      Thanks for the heads up on PLA and its reaction to liquids. I’ll definitely make a couple for future reference.

Post a Comment